Conservation@Home

Garden Refresh: It Starts With a Plan

Now that spring is here, the plans for the Garden Refresh project are coming along for re-designing and re-planting the native garden beds on two sides of the Clow House at The Conservation Foundation (TCF) McDonald Farm. Since it has been a number of years since the garden beds were planted, it’s time for an update!  The process began on a winter day when staff measured the garden areas and drew it out on paper. Jan Roehll, a landscape architect by training, took the lead on the project. Once she had the area mapped out, noting…

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Introducing Garden Refresh: Update Your Landscaping with Native Plants

In the midst of winter, many of you look forward to getting seed and bulb catalogs, eagerly thumbing through them, dreaming of springtime and warmer weather. The Conservation Foundation looks forward to re-doing the garden beds on the east and south sides of the Clow House office space at McDonald Farm in Naperville. In those beds, staff will plant native flowers and grasses to create a garden that is both environmentally friendly and attractive.  It’s been quite a few years since these beds were planted. Some plants prospered and grew too big for the space while…

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Create a Rain Garden to Reduce Flooding and Water Pollution

Standing water can cause big problems on your property: dead grass, leaky foundations, and a potential mosquito paradise if rain water fails to soak into the ground. Fortunately, there’s a way to help that water infiltrate instead of leaving it to pool atop your lawn.   A rain garden can help solve flooding problems on your property, and at the same time, add attractive landscaping to your yard and provide habitat for birds and butterflies! You can create a rain garden by digging a shallow basin in your yard and planting it with native plants that…

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Fall Leaf Collection Protects Rivers and Streams

Leaves are a big topic of research when it comes to water quality issues coming from residential neighborhoods in the fall. Rainwater leaches nutrients from leaves lying in the street, creating a kind of “leaf tea.” The nutrient-rich leaf tea then flows down storm drains and into local streams. The nutrients from leaves, especially phosphorous, cause algal blooms that lower oxygen levels in the stream–less oxygen makes it harder for fish and aquatic insects to live there.  The U.S. Geological…

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Enrich Your Soil with Fall Leaves and Leaf Mold

Leaves, like all organic materials, contain nutrients. The nutrients in leaves hurt our local rivers but help our lawns and gardens. This is because nutrients encourage plant growth. In streams, excess nutrients cause oxygen-depleting algae to grow, which hurts the fish and insects that live there. In your yard, these nutrients are beneficial since they fertilize plants you want to grow, like grass and garden vegetables.   When it rains, stormwater draws the nutrients out of the leaves similar to a…

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Get in Touch

Naperville, IL 60565

Phone: 630-428-4500
Fax: 630-428-4599
jhammer@theconservationfoundation.org

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2021 Meeting Dates

January 21
March 18
May 20
July 15
September 16
November 18